Google is on track for mobile search queries to overtake those on desktop this year, and today it took one more step forward in how it is will control that experience on behalf of its users — for better or for worse. The company has announced that it will now flag to its users when websites listed in their search results may have elements that will not show up on a users’ device. That unsupported code today typically results in missing elements and blank screens.

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unionmetrics:

Finally, Most Brands Measuring Social Content Effectiveness: Social shares, “likes” among the the most common measurements | eMarketer 

"According to the research, 80% of US client-side marketers measured the effectiveness of their social content, with social media metrics such as ‘likes’ the most common. Usage statistics—daily or monthly active users, for example—fell in the middle of the list. Meanwhile, metrics that could identify business ramifications were not used nearly as much, with financially based measurements such as return on investment and sales landing near the bottom" 

While these are simplistic measurements, it’s at least a good start in terms of pervasiveness. 

unionmetrics:

Finally, Most Brands Measuring Social Content Effectiveness: Social shares, “likes” among the the most common measurements | eMarketer 

"According to the research, 80% of US client-side marketers measured the effectiveness of their social content, with social media metrics such as ‘likes’ the most common. Usage statistics—daily or monthly active users, for example—fell in the middle of the list. Meanwhile, metrics that could identify business ramifications were not used nearly as much, with financially based measurements such as return on investment and sales landing near the bottom" 

While these are simplistic measurements, it’s at least a good start in terms of pervasiveness.