Digital advertising hits $43B, passing broadcast TV for the first time ever

This past year, digital advertising online and via mobile crossed the $40 billion mark for the first time ever, according to the Internet Advertising Bureau. Since 2004, the average growth rate has been 18 percent. And this year, digital ad revenues surpassed broadcast television for the first time. Not shockingly, mobile is leading the charge.

Read more over at VentureBeat

Digital advertising hits $43B, passing broadcast TV for the first time ever

This past year, digital advertising online and via mobile crossed the $40 billion mark for the first time ever, according to the Internet Advertising Bureau. Since 2004, the average growth rate has been 18 percent. And this year, digital ad revenues surpassed broadcast television for the first time. Not shockingly, mobile is leading the charge.

Read more over at VentureBeat

These publishers are reimagining the banner ad

While many advertisers have bought into the promise of scalable, programmatic buying, many publishers are hoping to draw them back with premium ad products. The New York Times, for example, has devoted an entire division to reinventing the banner via its Idea Lab. On a smaller scale, other publishers like Say Media, Vox Media, and Time Inc. are creating custom units that go far beyond the banner to give brands the sorts of premium ad experiences that are closer to magazines than banner ads.

Read and see more here

These publishers are reimagining the banner ad

While many advertisers have bought into the promise of scalable, programmatic buying, many publishers are hoping to draw them back with premium ad products. The New York Times, for example, has devoted an entire division to reinventing the banner via its Idea Lab. On a smaller scale, other publishers like Say Media, Vox Media, and Time Inc. are creating custom units that go far beyond the banner to give brands the sorts of premium ad experiences that are closer to magazines than banner ads.

Read and see more here

The Mobile Browser Is Dead, Long Live The App

Analytics firm Flurry has published data on mobile usage by US consumers during Q1 2014. While users are spending more time on their devices (an average of 2 hours and 42 minutes per day, up four minutes on the same period last year), how they use that time has changed as well. Only 22 minutes per day are spent in the browser, with the balance of time focused on applications.

Read the full article over at Forbes

The Mobile Browser Is Dead, Long Live The App

Analytics firm Flurry has published data on mobile usage by US consumers during Q1 2014. While users are spending more time on their devices (an average of 2 hours and 42 minutes per day, up four minutes on the same period last year), how they use that time has changed as well. Only 22 minutes per day are spent in the browser, with the balance of time focused on applications.

Read the full article over at Forbes

Layout in Flipboard for Web and Windows

How do we automate the whole process of layout design and editing? By slotting your content into custom designed page layouts—like fitting puzzle pieces together. We start with a set of page layouts created by human designers. Then, our layout engine figures out how to best fit your content into these layouts—considering things like page density, pacing, rhythm, image crop and scale.

Flipboards innovative approach to presenting content
Read in the article by Flipboard Engineering

Layout in Flipboard for Web and Windows

How do we automate the whole process of layout design and editing? By slotting your content into custom designed page layouts—like fitting puzzle pieces together. We start with a set of page layouts created by human designers. Then, our layout engine figures out how to best fit your content into these layouts—considering things like page density, pacing, rhythm, image crop and scale.

Flipboards innovative approach to presenting content

Read in the article by Flipboard Engineering

unionmetrics:

Who’s Engaging in Social TV? | Marketing Charts

"Broken down into demographic groups, the study finds that the most socially engaged were Hispanics, for whom 10.5% of viewing occasions could be deemed “socially connected viewing.” The next-most engaged were 25-34-year-olds (9.6%) and 15-24-year-olds (9.2%), while Asians (4.2%) and 45-54-year-olds (4.4%) were by far the least likely to engage in this activity."


Cat demographics have once again sadly been neglected. 

unionmetrics:

Who’s Engaging in Social TV? | Marketing Charts

"Broken down into demographic groups, the study finds that the most socially engaged were Hispanics, for whom 10.5% of viewing occasions could be deemed “socially connected viewing.” The next-most engaged were 25-34-year-olds (9.6%) and 15-24-year-olds (9.2%), while Asians (4.2%) and 45-54-year-olds (4.4%) were by far the least likely to engage in this activity."

Cat demographics have once again sadly been neglected. 

prostheticknowledge:

Deep Learning
Computer vision research project at the Purdue University is developing software that understands the world and objects that it sees:

Researchers are working to enable smartphones and other mobile devices to understand and immediately identify objects in a camera’s field of view, overlaying lines of text that describe items in the environment.
"It analyzes the scene and puts tags on everything," said Eugenio Culurciello, an associate professor in Purdue University’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering and the Department of Psychological Sciences.
The concept is called deep learning because it requires layers of neural networks that mimic how the human brain processes information. Internet companies are using deep-learning software, which allows users to search the Web for pictures and video that have been tagged with keywords. Such tagging, however, is not possible for portable devices and home computers.

More Here

prostheticknowledge:

Deep Learning

Computer vision research project at the Purdue University is developing software that understands the world and objects that it sees:

Researchers are working to enable smartphones and other mobile devices to understand and immediately identify objects in a camera’s field of view, overlaying lines of text that describe items in the environment.

"It analyzes the scene and puts tags on everything," said Eugenio Culurciello, an associate professor in Purdue University’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering and the Department of Psychological Sciences.

The concept is called deep learning because it requires layers of neural networks that mimic how the human brain processes information. Internet companies are using deep-learning software, which allows users to search the Web for pictures and video that have been tagged with keywords. Such tagging, however, is not possible for portable devices and home computers.

More Here

(via algopop)